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Don`t Worry, Just Laugh
Mobile Phone And Cancer: Your Best Friend Could Be Your Worse Enemy

We live in the world of hugely advanced technology where mobile phones and other technologies have become an inseparable part of our life. Advanced technologies have given rise to a greater speed and timely delivery of services, and high-level resilience and they enable researchers, teachers, and students benefit from advanced information – sharing techniques and coordination tools. Global connectivity allows rapid communication anywhere in the world. Personal mobile technology connects anyone in every village globally to the point that knowledge, markets, services, community have never been made closer. With our…

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Reckless Use of Academic Titles In Africa

“Hello, you are speaking with professor, doctor, architect, engineer, psychologist, barrister Dan Fodio. Who is on the line?”  “I am emeritus professor, doctor, pharmacist, senior pastor, apostle, solicitor, sir, judge, chief justice, engineer, Agric officer, vet doctor…… Hello, Are you still there……?” Welcome to Africa. Tell me your titles, I show you the degree of respect accorded to you. Recently, the indiscriminate use of academic titles by unqualified people has reached alarmingly an apex height. The situation is so deplorable that many educated individuals have decided rather not to use their…

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Poverty in Africa: Who Gets the Blame?

Poverty is more or less a manifestation of how a society shares its resources and how much of these (natural) resources are there overall. While some individuals describe poverty as a disease, others believe that poverty is a product of ignorance. Regardless, Africa has occupied an unenviable position worldwide as the Mecca of poverty. Statistically speaking, 34 out of the 50 nations on the 2006 UN list of least developed countries are in Africa. In 1820, the salary of an average European worker was about three times that of the…

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Proverb of the Month
Katakata.org

Asi deka melea todzo o.  Ewe (Ghana, Benin, Nigeria, and Togo) Mkono moja huwezi kushika nyati. (Swahili) Une seule main ne peut pas attraper un buffle. (French) One hand does not catch a buffalo. (English) This typical African proverb is popular amongst different tribes in West Africa, mostly from Ghana, Benin, Nigeria, and Togo. It teaches the importance of collectiveness as opposed to individualism. To solve a problem, community efforts are encouraged while individual endeavour is often considered futile and selfish. Buffalo is considered a very strong and dangerous animal;…

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Kenya’s Election Logjam: Judicial Independence, Security and Intimidation

The Chief Justice of Kenya David Maraga has accused the country’s Police of not providing security for the judiciary in the face of recent election tension in the country. The accusation was made, following the decision of the Supreme court of Kenya to nullify the August held the Presidential election, which the court declared null and void due to alleged charges “illegalities and irregularities” against the Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC). The court ordered a fresh re-election within 60 days. In a strong worded statement, the courageous judge, who…

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Free Secondary School Education in Ghana as President Nana Akufo -Addo Fulfils Election Promise

In honouring one of his core election promises, the newly elected president of Ghana, Nana Akufo-Addo has launched a new programme of free secondary school education in the country. The aim of the programme is to drastically reduce the number of school dropouts amongst children – especially amongst those with poor parents, who cannot afford the high costs of education. Presently, Primary school education is free in Ghana; with the new programme, it is expected that 400,000 new students entering secondary school this year will benefit from the ambitious project,…

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Togo: Will President Faure Gnassingbé Bow Out (Dis)gracefully?

In an unprecedented defiance of the brute force of the security apparatus and a clear challenge to President Faure Gnassingbé’s rigid authority, tens of thousands of Togolese have angrily protested on the streets of Togo’s capital, Lomé, demanding the introduction of a two-term presidential limit and the end of what they called the “Gnassingbé dynasty.” Never before has Togo, a country known for its little tolerance for demonstrations and freedom of speech, witnessed such a multitude of courageous demonstrators against the government. President Faure Gnassingbé, who has been at the…

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Kenya Election and Legitimacy as Raila Odinga Gives Conditions for re-run Election Participation

Kenya’s opposition leader Raila Odinga has vowed to boycott the upcoming presidential election re-run scheduled for 17 October “without legal and constitutional guarantees” that the election would be conducted free and fair. Last week, the supreme court of Kenya cancelled the August presidential election, won by the incumbent President Uhuru Kenyatta, because according to the court, the Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC) had committed “illegalities and irregularities” in the transmission of results. According to the court verdict, the commission had not followed the Constitution. The court went ahead to…

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Kenya Election Nullification: Interpreting President Kenyatta’s “We Must Fix it’ Vows

Following the nullification of his re-election by the supreme court on Friday, the president of Kenya, Uhuru Kenyatta, has vowed, a day after, to “fix” the judiciary of his country. According to the president, who intimated that he totally disagreed with the verdict of the court, but will respect it, the court has “a problem,” which he promised to “fix” if re-elected. Following allegations of frauds, the Supreme court of Kenya on Friday declared the last month’s presidential poll in Kenya – which saw President Uhuru Kenya re-elected for the…

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Liberian Election Fever And George Weah ‘Assassination’ Allegations

While Liberians are anxiously waiting and hoping for a peaceful political transition of power through the election come 10 October, after years of bloody civil war and political instabilities, which gave birth to relative political stability under the outgoing President  Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, the news of the alleged assassination attempt on the life of George M. Weah, the opposition candidate, has caused different reactions amongst Liberians. Last week, Weah’s opposition Coalition for Democratic Change (CDC), reported that three men claimed to have been hired by businessman George Kailando, a member…

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